The skirting has arrived!

The stone skirting we ordered has arrived and is starting to be installed.

The radius on the top isn’t as perfect as I’d hoped, but we’ll live with it. That’s something we might be able to correct one day but the top edge needs a good polish anyway so that might iron out a bit of the flat spots. I know it’s possible to produce a nicely rounded edge - I bought some marble from Turkey for the Marriott Courtyard Hotel in Tbilisi which had beautifully rounded and polished edges. If anyone ever visits that hotel then the bar and the hot and cold buffet counters a bit further along from the bar were all drawn up and procured by yours truly. The cold buffet counter in particular (a sort of London Underground logo shape) was well worth the sweating and loss of sleep in the days leading up to it arriving and being fitted. We had Indian stonemasons on that job - they were the best of the best!

Here’s what it will look like after a bit of spit and polish - it goes quite well with the floor:

Stone Skirting

The skirting has just been loose-laid for the most part so far, but this is what the room will look like:

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Mitring was never my forté so this is a lot better than I would have managed - even in wood. Once it’s permanently fixed, filled, and polished it should look ok. We could even round those external corners off a bit.

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There’s a bit of jiggery pokery going on where the door opens but that will look ok after a final polish.

Adjustment needed to allow for the door to open

The living room flooring is nearly finished now.

Living room flooring nearly finished

This shows the plastic spaces and wedges which are used to get the floor perfectly spaced and level with each other. It’s a slow job and a little bit expensive but it needs to be done right because Georgi’s electric wheelchair, especially, is very heavy so the floor needs to be rock solid with no voids, and no flexure as there are underfloor heating pipes laid below it.

Plastic Spacers and Wedges

We’re now thinking of using the same material to form the ramp up to the bathroom floor level. I still need to think about this a little because I would have preferred the door frame to be where the wall is rather than set back into the bathroom (and looking plain ugly from the inside) but there’s no reason why we can’t have a large gap between the bottom of the door and the ramp. It might even be possible to adjust a drop seal enough to cover that gap.

Stone ramp to bathroom floor level

Flooring Progress

The flooring in both bedrooms has now been completed, and the living room is progressing nicely. There’s no threshold between the rooms as we want as few obstacles to the wheelchair as possible. Instead, we’re going to install drop seals in the doors to keep the noise level down. We were originally thinking of putting a brass strip where the orientation of the floor tiles changes but, aside from being hard to get hold of here, the joints will be hidden under the doors when they’re closed

All that remains is to fill the joints and install the stone skirting which is 2cm thick x 6cm high, with a 2cm quarter radius on the top.

Bedroom looking towards the balcony:

Bedroom Flooring

Bedroom looking towards the living room:

Bedroom Flooring

Living room looking towards the bedrooms:

Living Room Flooring

Disabled Living

Here’s a very useful YouTube Channel for wheelchair users - not simply from an accessible home design point of view but other basic things about how to get by if you find yourself confined to a wheelchair for any length of time.

Sometimes the simple ideas are the best - check out the extra handle on the garage door as we take a look around Brian’s home:

Check out Brian’s main channel for more of his videos…

https://www.youtube. … ackpearlv6/featured

Lorient Door Drop Seals

These are the drop seals which I want to install in the bottom of the interior doors. They neatly install in a routed channel made in the bottom of the door and are held in place by two end plates.

They are adjusted by screwing the operating button in or out to allow for different gaps between the bottom of the door and the floor/threshold.

Used in conjunction with perimeter seals (from the same company) and decent quality doors this should provide and effective sound barrier between the bedrooms and the living room, and also between the corridor and the entrance lobby.

How drop seals work

They are also made in Britain!

An automatic house

There was an interesting article on the BBC website today about a guy who has turned his home into one which watches who is in the building and alerts the owner if there is someone there which it doesn’t recognise. It also adjusts the heating etc. if someone turns up who prefers the house a little warmer or cooler, and the developer expects to be able to expand his system to allow him to “talk” to the house and just issue whatever commands he wants.

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-38261690

It may all sound a bit geeky and even a bit sinister from a privacy point of view, but this is exactly the kind of system which I am surprised hasn’t been developed by a big company such as Amazon or Google because it could open up the possibility of affording a much greater degree of independence for disabled people.

Couple this with a few robots for specialist operations such as getting someone in and out of bed, or to the bathroom, and it would be just brilliant for someone like Georgi to be able to live more or less on his own, yet still be monitored in case he needs help with something.

more-robots-please.jpg