In the kitchen…

The kitchen used to be very small - it still is, but it’s bigger than the mere corridor it used to be before we moved one of the walls back and made a doorway out onto the terrace.

Arch Begone!

I miss it, now its gone :( The archway into the kitchen has been removed. It wasn’t a very smooth arch but I think that’s what I liked about it the most.

Anyway - it is no more…

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In other news…

We’ve upgraded our builder to a newer, faster model so we now have some progress being made on the terrace. Unfortunately our old builder dragged his heels so much that one of the components of the waterproofing membrane we were going to install there (not critical - just a belt & braces approach) went hard so we’re just going to screed it and tile it. However we are also installing steel base plates and anchors which will be used to fix the roof structure to - if and when that happens.

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It’ll make a world of difference just to be able to sit out there in a chair.

The kitchen wall has been tidied up too. It’s no less confusing what all those cables are for and there’s certainly a bit of work to do to make it so we can fasten the back boxes in place, but it looks better than it did.

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And the floor is creeping over towards the front door…

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There’s just the kitchen floor to lay now, then all the skirting.

The skirting has arrived!

The stone skirting we ordered has arrived and is starting to be installed.

The radius on the top isn’t as perfect as I’d hoped, but we’ll live with it. That’s something we might be able to correct one day but the top edge needs a good polish anyway so that might iron out a bit of the flat spots. I know it’s possible to produce a nicely rounded edge - I bought some marble from Turkey for the Marriott Courtyard Hotel in Tbilisi which had beautifully rounded and polished edges. If anyone ever visits that hotel then the bar and the hot and cold buffet counters a bit further along from the bar were all drawn up and procured by yours truly. The cold buffet counter in particular (a sort of London Underground logo shape) was well worth the sweating and loss of sleep in the days leading up to it arriving and being fitted. We had Indian stonemasons on that job - they were the best of the best!

Here’s what it will look like after a bit of spit and polish - it goes quite well with the floor:

Stone Skirting

The skirting has just been loose-laid for the most part so far, but this is what the room will look like:

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Mitring was never my forté so this is a lot better than I would have managed - even in wood. Once it’s permanently fixed, filled, and polished it should look ok. We could even round those external corners off a bit.

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There’s a bit of jiggery pokery going on where the door opens but that will look ok after a final polish.

Adjustment needed to allow for the door to open

The living room flooring is nearly finished now.

Living room flooring nearly finished

This shows the plastic spaces and wedges which are used to get the floor perfectly spaced and level with each other. It’s a slow job and a little bit expensive but it needs to be done right because Georgi’s electric wheelchair, especially, is very heavy so the floor needs to be rock solid with no voids, and no flexure as there are underfloor heating pipes laid below it.

Plastic Spacers and Wedges

We’re now thinking of using the same material to form the ramp up to the bathroom floor level. I still need to think about this a little because I would have preferred the door frame to be where the wall is rather than set back into the bathroom (and looking plain ugly from the inside) but there’s no reason why we can’t have a large gap between the bottom of the door and the ramp. It might even be possible to adjust a drop seal enough to cover that gap.

Stone ramp to bathroom floor level

The Arch

I quite like the archway into the kitchen now, even with all its current imperfections.

Maybe we could have a bigger archway (or half-arch) at the wall in front of the side window?

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Internal Paint Colours

We’ve finally decided on the paint colours for the rooms. Caparol is widely available in Tbilisi so we want use CapaPlus (it says CapaTrade on the tin) Silk Emulsion so we can wash mark off it more easily.

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I think the above paint may be only manufactured by Caparol in the UAE (caparol.ae) so the equivalent which seems to be widely available in Europe is Caparol Capaver Silk Finish:

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All ceilings will be white but the wall colours of the room will be generally yellow for the living room and corridor, peach for the kitchen and one of the bedrooms, and blue/green for the other bedroom, so the colour key for the the living room would look like this:

Living Room Colours

Living Room & Corridor

Walls: Caparol CURRY 120

Caparol CURRY 120

Coffered Ceiling (Ceiling Border plus Ceiling in Corridor): Caparol CURRY 115

Caparol CURRY 115

Georgi’s Bedroom

Walls: Caparol COELIN 60

Caparol COELIN 60

Coffered Ceiling (Ceiling Border): Caparol COELIN 55

Caparol COELIN 55

Other Bedroom & Kitchen

Walls: Caparol APRICO 180

Caparol APRICO 180

Coffered Ceiling (Ceiling Border): Caparol APRICO 175

Caparol APRICO 175

In all areas except the kitchen the coffered border around the edges of the room will be a slightly darker shade of the wall colour, with the rest of the ceilings in white. This begs the question of what to do where the coffer at the living room entrance continues through as the corridor ceiling? Either we paint that ceiling in the yellow colour or paint it white but have a yellow edge to it where it forms the coffer in the living room.

I think it would look better if we simply continues the yellow colour through on the corridor ceiling - so it would look something like this:

Corridor Ceiling Colour

In the kitchen the whole of the ceiling will be white.

All the Caparol colours are here:

http://www.caparol.de/gestaltung/farbtonkollektionen/3d-system-plus.html

Archway to the kitchen

The archway to the kitchen is better than it looks…

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A more head on view, and you can see the profile looking rather better in the reflection in the balcony door, shows that the arch is not too far from being a perfect hemisphere. If this was done purely by hand and eye then it’s not a bad effort.

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The green circle is what I would have considered to be perfect but I actually prefer the top of the arch being a little higher (as shown by the red circle) and it doesn’t stretch the imagination too much to see how good it could be made to look with a bit of fine tuning… and with the walls being finished properly. Perhaps even line the arch and/or disguise any rough edges with architrave, or some creative paintwork…

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